Leiden Law Blog

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Tag: Sentencing

  • Letting offenders pay

    Letting offenders pay

    Gwen van Eijk | | 2
    The Dutch government wants prisoners to contribute to the cost of their own imprisonment: 16 Euros per day spent in prison. What has not been addressed in the debate so far, is that offenders are not equally likely to be sentenced to prison.
  • Sentencing the unemployed offender

    Sentencing the unemployed offender

    Gwen van Eijk | | 2
    Offenders with a non-Dutch background go to prison more often and longer than native Dutch offenders. One explanation is that judges take into account whether offenders work or not. But differentiation based on work status may be problematic in itself.
  • Why (Dutch) criminologists should be outraged

    Why (Dutch) criminologists should be outraged

    Gwen van Eijk | | 0
    Comfortable prisons, lenient judges, low prison rates, no death penalty – in comparing criminal justice in the Netherlands to policies in other countries, Dutch criminologists can be content. Or can they?
  • ‘These sentences send out a strong signal’

    ‘These sentences send out a strong signal’

    The imposed maximum juvenile detention sentences in the infamous ‘Linesman-case’ give rise to the question whether retribution, general deterrence and compensation for a shocked society can be considered legitimate objectives of Dutch juvenile justice.
  • Our Poor Cousin - The Public Pronouncements of Judgments

    Our Poor Cousin - The Public Pronouncements of Judgments

    Ard Schoep | | 0
    There is something strange about the way we think about the public pronouncement of judgments in criminal cases. We treat one of the defining moments in criminal trials as our poor cousin. I think we should seriously consider taking him back in the family.
  • The Robert M. case: multiple victims and sentencing

    The Robert M. case: multiple victims and sentencing

    Ard Schoep | | 0
    Breivik stands trial for killing 77 people; Robert M. for abusing 67 children. Cold numbers that make us speechless. In both cases, the accused are indicted for making many victims. Does it matter in sentencing? And how much?